Duty of Care – Report The Abuse
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Duty of Care

× Report the Abuse ceased operations as an NGO on 20 August 2017. The webpage and its contents are no longer updated. Thank you for your support, and we encourage all visitors to keep addressing sexual violence against humanitarian aid workers.

In a post Steve Dennis v. NRC world, duty of care is an increasingly popular topic, and rightly so. Humanitarian organisations are beginning to understand what actions they must take to meet their obligations to provide duty of care to their staff members.

These discussions have rarely included information or analysis about sexual violence however. This paper is the first step towards an understanding about the actions humanitarian organisations can and must take to creating work and living environments free from sexual violence.

Duty of Care: Protection of Humanitarian Aid Workers from Sexual Violence